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Irish Guards and Norman Bastards

Prince WilliamPrince William was married today in red - wearing the famous tunic of an Irish Guards officer rather than his RAF uniform.

This deliberate insult to all Irish calls to mind what one of America’s most prominent Founding Fathers Thomas Paine said in his booklet Common Sense (1776), written in reaction to what Paine called the “massacres” of American citizen soldier Minutemen at Lexington and Concord by professional Hessian Mercenaries killing Americans  at the behest of the British Monarchy.

To paraphrase Paine: Who founded the British Monarchy? It was that Norman Bastard and his Gang of Armed Bandits!  William, dubbed the “Conqueror,” was the Bastard Son of the Norman King.
 
Paine’s exact words were: : “A French bastard landing with an armed banditti, and establishing himself king of England against the consent of the natives, is in plain terms a very paltry rascally original.”
 
Plus ca change, plus ca reste la meme chose.

Francis Boyle, Professor of international law at the University of Illinois College of Law in Champaign, Boyle is author of "United Ireland, Human Rights and International Law." 
 
He said today: "Some controversy has surrounded the use of the word 'genocide' with regard to the Great Irish Famine. But this controversy has its source in an apparent misunderstanding of the meaning of genocide. No, the British government did not inflict on the Irish the abject horrors of the Nazi Holocaust. But the definition of 'genocide' reaches beyond such ghastly behavior to encompass other reprehensible acts designed to destroy a people." Boyle wrote "The Irish Famine was Genocide."


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