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The Meaning of Dieudonné

DieudonnéSince the 1968 Student Revolution, the European and American Left, together with a herd of Jewish progressive intellectuals, have invested enormous effort in attempting to break society down into multiple segments of identities.

The Left adopted this peculiar approach because it could never cope with its own failure to bond with working people.

The Jewish intellectuals, who led the campaign, realized that fragmented and divided nations are far less dangerous for Jews. As we know, Jews are threatened by cohesive, patriotic nationalism, and for a good reason. After all, they were amongst the prime victims of such an ideology.

Bizarrely enough, dazzled by the emerging false prophecy of post-68 ‘identity politics,’ the Left was quick to drop its universal ethos. While in the past it aimed to cross the divide and unite the working people, the post-68 Left actually split and ghettoized the Western subjects by means of identification.

Instead of being and celebrating who and what we are, we’ve learned to identify with ready-made soundbites. Rather than simply being Jill, Joseph, Abe or Youssef, we are now identified ‘as a woman’, ‘as a gay’, ‘as a Jew’, ‘as a Muslim’, and so on.

In practice, the New Left has been erecting walls around us in an attempt to separate us into infinitesimally small, marginal identity groups. Peculiarly, it is the post-68 Left, rather than the capitalists, that drove us into segregation, isolation and political paralysis.

But then, pretty much out of the blue, Dieudonné, a black French comedian, has managed to re-unite the working people: the migrant communities, the Black, the Muslim, the North African as well as the White proletarian and at the same time, to deliver a universal message.

Dieudonné has reminded us what the Left stood for in the first place, before it was conquered by Marcuse and his Frankfurt Yeshiva’s pals.  It is the French entertainer who brings to light the most instinctive Left insight -- we are actually united and identified in opposition to our oppressors, namely, the establishment.  

The ‘quenelle’ -- a salute that was initially introduced by Dieudonné -- embodies a modest and graceful openness of true resistance. It is a simple, restrained and poetic take on the crude Anglo-American ‘up yours’.

The gesture is obviously universal and an open call -- everyone, including Jews, are welcome in, as opposed to the post-68 identity discourses that are largely defined by biology and race. Being an emblem of an ethically driven and universalist standpoint the quenelle also symbolizes an opposition to the primacy of Jewish suffering and the tyranny of political correctness. 

Dieudonné is the definitive hero of genuine socialist thinking in the spirit of the Paris Commune, and as such, he indeed poses a great danger to fake New Leftists and their paymasters at CRIF. The kosher Frankfurt graduate sees the French masses gathering momentum and the people marching in the streets of Paris shouting ‘the emperor has no clothes’.

In fact, there is not much to be concealed or suppressed anymore. Once again, the bare truth reveals itself and against all odds.


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